Befreiungskriege 1813-14

Painting and modelling 28mm Napoleonic wargaming miniatures

Painting the gilded lily

Posted by Martin on January 9, 2010

Painted and based Saxon officer

Painted and based Saxon officer

Cast your minds back to last September (oh, where has the time gone?) and you’ll recall I did some modifications to a Calpe Saxon musketeer officer. Well, the next step was to use this figure for my colour palette experiments. I also wanted to try out my new basing materials – model railway ballast and Silflor tufts. You can see the result in the photo here.

Of course, I don’t normally base up single figures like this but it was always intended as a one-off experiment and I do have a highly specific subsequent use in mind for this figure. In terms of the colour experiments, it was mainly a case of fine tuning decisions I’d already made and just double checking that they would work properly Specifically, I’ve used this figure to verify the following combinations:

  • For yellow metal: VMC Burnt Umber, VMC Brass and VMC Gold.
  • For yellow: VMC Flat Earth, VMC Yellow Ochre, VMC Flat Yellow, VMC Lemon Yellow.
  • For grey-blue: VMC Prussian Blue, VMC Grey Blue and VMC Deep Sky Blue.
  • For white: Andrea White Set 2nd Shadow, Andrea White Set 1st Shadow and Miniature Paints White.

In addition, I painted the blanket roll using the Foundry Rawhide triad over a basecoat of VMC German Camo. Black Brown.

As you can see, I’m still tweaking recipes – in particular the one for white. I think I now have enough contrast between each of the three layers and a white with sufficiently good coverage (thanks to an indirect recommendation from Peter Royle via Peter F.).

This was also the first time I’ve broken into my stash of Silflor grass tufts and I’m pretty pleased with the result. Just two tufts were sufficient to create a pleasing effect but the one tip I will pass on about these is that you need to press them down firmly with tweasers into a blob of PVA to get them to stay put.

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11 Responses to “Painting the gilded lily”

  1. Rob said

    I think the yellow came out wonderfully… can you proide the paints you used for the Shako as well?

    Rob

  2. A nice job all around Martin. So no surprises there then!! 8O) The Silflor tufts are magic. A great product that adds so much for so little effort.

    I’ll be very interested to see some white coats to pick up a hint or 22.

    I trust you are enjoying the snow!! 8O))

    Salute
    von Peter himself

  3. Alan said

    Nice work Martin! I think it would look even better in the picture with a white background though. Where does one obtain silflor tufts?

    Any news yet from Calpe Towers re. Saxon artillery and grenadiers?

    Alan

    • Martin said

      Er…yes, the background is supposed to be white but I had a few minor technical issues with lighting and white balance.

      Silflor tufts, eh? I purchased mine from a trader at Colours but Antenociti’s Workshop usually has soem in stock. Take a look here.

      • Alan said

        Thanks Martin,

        That was a very helpful link.

        I know what you mean about white balance in pictures, it can be tricky. I use Adobe Photoshop Elements and I think I have more or less mastered that particular issue now. I find Elements fairly easy to use and I can get the results I want. I take important pictures in “Raw” mode on my SLR and that gives an opening screen in elements which allows light balance ajustments before opening in photoshop edit. Once these ajustments have been made then the picture can be saved as a JPEG image. The original raw image is preserved. Forgive me if I am teaching Granny to suck eggs here!

        Alan

  4. Hussarbob said

    Very nice work indeed! Congratulations

  5. Iannick said

    Nice indeed! I love your style, quite unique.

  6. Peter Royle said

    Cracking job Martin. Have you tried the Noch tufts a bit more expensive than Silflor but give more variation and easier to handle.

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